Here’s to a Great crew

Here’s a view I don’t normally see during sail training. The crew is hard at work setting sails and I am not only, not on the ship, I’m not even on the pier. Last night’s sail training was the first session I have not attended for the entire class. I had a pretty good excuse though. I had to go watch my oldest daughter Hannah, who is graduating from High School Saturday, receive awards and accolades during the school’s convocation. Perhaps I’ll have more on that topic another time.

This crew, some 60 people in all, trying out for around 14 spots on our sailing crew has been about the strongest group of candidates ever. Everyone has been quick to pick up what they need to know about furling, and setting sails, the names of lines and what they are all for, and even during our safety sessions they all seem to be paying attention. It will be as, I have said to them, very difficult to pick the luck few. But, that is the nature of this try-out and I hope everyone has been mindful of the fact that while there are many qualified candidates we can only accommodate a small percentage.

That language always reminds me of the process our family has been going through lately with our daughter applying to college. There are many more candidates, all with great gpa’s etc. who will not be chosen to attend their dream school. I suppose, like our sail training crew, it is a mixed blessing. It is reassuring to see the high level of interest in Mayflower II, but unfortunate we cannot find a spot for everyone.

 I am very grateful to everyone who has tried out and worked hard to be apart of Mayflower II’s fiftieth anniversary and I hope they have learned more about our ship and will continue to stay in contact with us. Now if we could only find a way to get people to pay us the kinds of tuition students are paying to attend those over-enrolled colleges, hmm….

2 Comments

  1. Edward P Winslow

    Has anything been heard recently from my kinsman John Winslow who was a Royal Navy jet pilot in 1957 and was granted leave to crew on the trip to Plymouth from the UK? I saw John about 15 years ago in Sydney, Australia. He was then a retired Qantas pilot. He was descended from Kenelm Winslow, brother of Pilgrim Edward from whom I am descended. Good luck with the 50th anniv.

    Edward P Winslow

  2. Edward P Winslow

    Has anything been heard recently from my kinsman John Winslow who was a Royal Navy jet pilot in 1957 and was granted leave to crew on the trip to Plymouth from the UK? I saw John about 15 years ago in Sydney, Australia. He was then a retired Qantas pilot. He was descended from Kenelm Winslow, brother of Pilgrim Edward from whom I am descended. Good luck with the 50th anniv.

    Edward P Winslow

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