Friends of Mayflower II

The mayflower sailing crew, the Garvey building volunteers and the maritime artisans staff continued to make great strides this week. Thursday night our sailing crew spent two hours scraping and sanding the ship in preparation to painting. We had three or four people on the main mast scraping away the old linseed oil finish. We had two or three crew doing the same out on the bowsprit. At this point we have lots of surface area on the ship ready for paint. John, Paula and Dick Beane spent the day priming the bare spots around the ship.

The Garvey project took a great leap forward today. We worked from 9 am until 3 pm this afternoon and were able to make the last five frames. We have spent 45 hours to date on the project. We started on January 26th and have worked only 3 hours a day on a total of 15 Fridays.

The frames are all made from the Body plan, which is a full size drawing developed from the lofting. While the frame building team finished up Jack led a team setting up the finished frames. It is always a nice to see the frames go up. The real shape of the boat becomes apparent and it becomes clearer that we are actually building a boat and not some random collection of oddly shaped bits of wood.

This project continues to be an example of what our volunteers can accomplish from raising funds and materials for the boat to providing the labor necessary to build it. We are having fun, building something necessary for Mayflower’s upkeep and providing the museum with a valuable asset that will be around for years to come.

The Mayflower, somehow, attracts volunteers, whether to be part of the sailing crew, the painting and scraping crew, or our boat building team. People seem to want to participate in and be connected with the ship particularly because of the anniversary this year. Our goal, and our challenge, is to keep people interested in the ship beyond the excitement of this year. The Garvey will be around for a long time to come, the ship too. We will need to find ways in the years to come to keep those Friends of the Mayflower engaged and excited to lend a hand and keep us all afloat.

Nest week, weather permitting, should feature a lot of painting on Mayflower and continued training for our upcoming voyage.

3 Comments

  1. eric

    Hello, I am cururious to know why the mayflower doesn’t have the bright colors-blues, stripes, and so on-it once did–and is usally shown as 16th/17th century ship colors. Is this toned-down design considered more authentic?

  2. eric

    Hello, I am cururious to know why the mayflower doesn’t have the bright colors-blues, stripes, and so on-it once did–and is usally shown as 16th/17th century ship colors. Is this toned-down design considered more authentic?

  3. David Nordin

    My name is Dave Nordin. I am on the maintenance committee for Friends of the Viking Ship, the trustee owners of the Viking ship replica which was built in 1893 and sailed from Norway to the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Our ship is no longer seaworthy and there are no plans to make it so, but it still draws thousands of visitors who come to see it and hear its story. We are in the process of fund raising to create a permanent, temperature controlled museum space for it. In the meantime, however, it is kept in a park under a synthetic tarp-covered Quonset hut structure.
    We are currently in the process of determining the best formula for long term preservation of the ship’s wood and the thousands of rivets which pierce its strakes and hold the vessel together. When it was built as a sailing vessel in 1893, it was impregnated with a pine tar, linseed oil and turpentine mixture. However, there is some concern about using an (edible) linseed oil mixture today on an artifact which is kept on land, shaded, under a landscape tarp shelter, where we cannot prevent the entry of insects or mice.
    Could any of you on Mayflower II’s conservation team offer any suggestions?
    By the way, I visited Mayflower II in 2013 and was very impressed both with the ongoing care it receives and the quality of the onboard interpretation.

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