On The Upward Trail

Frame stock planed and ready for shaping

Frame stock planed and ready for shaping

Here is the first sign that we are headed in the right direction with the repair work. This is the first frame stock, in the carpentry shop at Fairhaven Shipyard.

The stock as been sent through the big thickness planer and now awaits cutting to the pattern that is resting on top.  Hurrah!

Fitting the first frame into place on the ship.

Fitting the first frame into place on the ship.

Here three shipyard workers are fitting the newly cut frame into place on the ship. Two things to note here: The use of the two boom lifts to raise the crew and the stock up to the right height, ( Our marine staff is so jealous); and notice how nicely the piece fits and restores the lovely shape of the ships stern.

 

Old fastening holes filed.

Old fastening holes filled. 

Here we see the one of the reasons this kind of work is so labor intensive. The old fastenings have been removed, which is a process in itself, then each hole in the frames has to be filled with a wooden dowel shaped just right and glued in place. Two men, about a days work.

 

 

bad knees.

bad knees.

 

Bad knee

Bad knee

 

 

 

 

 

You know how when you get a little older your joints start to ache? Same thing with Mayflower II. Here are two knees that need to be replaced. i know this because the Coast Guard inspector kindly wrote “replace” on one of them.

wasted fastening.

wasted fastening.

Here’s one reason why the knees, and other parts of the ship , are in such tough shape. This iron fastening, in this case up in the bow, has deteriorated. Fresh water dripping on the fastening causes rust. The rust expands the fastening and puts pressure on the wood it is holding in place. In the case of the knees, the fastenings are in line with each other, and therefore eventually split the timber.

 

Keith cutting away the rot on the stem

Keith cutting away the rot on the stem

I am sure you will recognize Keith from the marine shop crew. We were working on the stem repair, mandated by the C.G. Bad news we had to cut away about three inches of wood off the back side of the stem. The good news we only had to cut away three inches of wood off the back of the stem. Tomorrow the Coat Guard inspectors will take a look at the work to date and we will head onward and upward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Comments

  1. Kenneth Patel

    I have visited the MayflowerII and Plimoth Rock. What an apsollutely Amazing expirience and a Must for All to have!

  2. Mrs. Lynn Cartledge

    Dear Mr. Arenstam,
    First off let me say what a blessing it is to have someone as dedicated and professional on Team Mayflower11 as you are. Your postings are informative, educational and lively. Thank you.

    As a direct (Mayflower) Rogers descendant, I have long dreamed of coming to New England to “walk in the footsteps of history”; both our collective history and my family’s as well. Now in my 60’s, this dream trip is finally to be realized April 23-May 1, 2013!

    I was absolutely crushed when I got the E-mail saying that the ship has been pulled away from visitors for (understandably needed) repairs. Having undertaken home renovations myself, I know how unexpected discoveries add expense and time to almost any project. Your task is much more daunting, and important.

    My questions are these: Do you have any idea as to when she will be ready to return? Is there any chance on God’s green earth (and deep blue seas!) that it might be during the time of our visit???? Is it possible, perhaps, just to see her, but not board her? I am truly very interested.

    Thank you for your work, and time to read this. L.A.Cartledge

    • Mrs. Cartledge,
      First, thank you so much for your kind words about the work we do here at Plimoth Plantation and specifically mayflower II. We have always said, a ship, in in particular our Mayflower II, engenders strong feelings from those who are associated with her. Whether it is showing up day after day after day to do what is necessary to keep the ship seaworthy, visiting once but spreading the word of the magic that happens here, or finding a way to contribute monetarily, we are all touched by the ship and compelled to do what we can for her. It is the museum’s hope and the wish of countless others that mayflower II continue to impact all of our lives.

      As to you your concrete question. I can only say that we are doing everything we can to get the ship back as soon as safely possible. I am not sure it will be in Plymouth at the end of April but you should plan to visit New England and soak up, as you say, our vast collective history.
      Thanks for your comments!

      Peter

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