There’s a reason why Plimoth Patuxet Museums is one of the most popular field trip destinations in New England! History comes alive at Mayflower II, the 17th-Century English Village, and the Wampanoag Homesite.

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Your Field Trip Your Way

Immersive, interactive, and fun! Enhance your visit with a guided tour, customized workshop, or themed dining experience. There's something for everyone!

Guided Tours:

Explore Plimoth's main living history exhibits with a Museum Educator and discover the powerful stories of people who actually lived along these shores of change 400 years ago. This 2-hour program is best suited to grades 3+ and can be adapted to fit grade, unit, or curricular goals.

Be a History Detective! Teams search for clues and discover how indigenous and colonial communities overcame unique challenges in the past and still shape our communities today. This 2-hour program is best suited to grades 3-5.

Landscapes tell important stories about "community" on this guided tour of the original Patuxet and Plimoth - now Plymouth's thriving downtown cultural district. This 1-hour tour includes key sites such as Burial Hill (the site of the original settlement), Town Brook (where Patuxet got its name), and the Plimoth Grist Mill (originally built in 1636). This 1-hour program is best suited to grades 3+ and can be adapted to fit grade, unit, or curricular goals.

An express 30-minute guided tour explores the original Patuxet and Plimoth - now Plymouth's thriving downtown cultural district - and asks why people have chosen to live on this spot for over 12,000 years. This program is best suited to grades 3+ and can be adapted to fit grade, unit, or curricular goals.

Museum Workshops for Early Childhood

Experience the 1621 harvest feast through play! First, hear the story, then play the story by rotating through centers with reproduction Wampanoag and Colonial objects from the first Thanksgiving.

How did Wampanoag and Colonial children work and play? Learn about work, then play the Native and English games children would have played in 17th-century New England!

Museum Workshops for Older Learners

Explore traditional Wampanoag Culture and Lifeways through hands-on object discovery. Guided by a Native Museum Teacher, students will have the opportunity to handle reproduction artifacts and animal furs while asking questions about both 17th-century and contemporary Wampanoag communities. This workshop is available from March - November. Massachusetts History and Social Science Frameworks: 2.7, 2.8, 3.2, 3.12, 4.11, 4.15.

Students discuss the many different ways 17th-century children were educated, whether in a classroom, through an apprenticeship, or at home). Try writing with a quill pen and ink and compare it to today’s writing tools. Create a personalized unique 17th-century signature to take home. Massachusetts History and Social Science Frameworks: 2.7, 2.8, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.12, 4.11, 4.14, 4.15.

People in the past recorded stories in many different ways. Pilgrims shared stories with written words on paper, and the Wampanoag shared stories with designs on wampum belts. Students learn the 17th-century alphabet and practice writing using chalk on slate, or quill and ink on old-style paper, then learn about wampum belts and create their own original design.

Young citizen-students explore the Mayflower Compact as a founding document of our democracy and create their own 17th-century signature with quill and ink.

Students work in teams and use clues hidden in historic art to discover the identity of a mysterious artifact. Massachusetts History and Social Science Frameworks: 2.7, 2.8, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.12, 4.11, 4.14, 4.15.

Students study the Mayflower Compact - and those individuals who crafted it - as an inspiration for the democratic vision of our nation’s 18th-century founders. Students engage with the original language of the document to better understand the Mayflower Compact as government by the consent of the governed before drafting their own classroom compact.

What really happened at the First Thanksgiving? Who was at the table and why? Students explore the history behind the legend by comparing written and oral accounts of the harvest feast and examining colonial and indigenous artifacts.

To book a field trip, contact:

groupsales@plimoth.org | (508) 503-2653